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Georg-Simmel-Zentrum für Metropolenforschung

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Georg-Simmel-Zentrum für Metropolenforschung | alle Dateien (Fotos, PDFs, etc.) | Termine | Home Free: Prisoner Reentry and Residential Change after Hurricane Katrina

Home Free: Prisoner Reentry and Residential Change after Hurricane Katrina

Wann 13.01.2020 von 18:00 bis 20:00 (Europe/Berlin / UTC100) iCal
Wo Universitätsstraße 3b; 10117 Berlin; R002
Kontaktname
Kontakt Telefon 015785076636
Teilnehmer
  • David Kirk, University of Oxford
  • (Chair) Prof. Talja Blokland, Humboldt University
Website Externe Website öffnen

 

Title: Home Free: Prisoner Reentry and Residental Change after Hurricane Katrina

Speaker: David Kirk, University of Oxford

(Abstract below / Kurzbeschreibung s. unten)

ENGLISH
The Think and Drink Series is presented by the Georg-Simmel-Center for Metropolitan Studies @ HU Berlin
-> on Mondays 6pm ct Room 002 (Ground Floor)
-> Universitätsstraße 3b / 10117 Berlin
-> Free & open to anyone interested in Urban Sociology, no prior registration needed
-> Talks and discussions take place in English language (with few exceptions)

DEUTSCH
Die Veranstaltungen der Think and Drink Reihe werden präsentiert vom Georg-Simmel-Zentrum für Metropolenforschung an der HU Berlin.
-> immer Montags 18 Uhr ct. in Raum 002 (Erdgeschoss)
-> Universitätsstraße 3b / 10117 Berlin
-> Kostenlos und offen für alle stadtsoziologisch Interessierten, keine vorherige Anmeldung nötig
-> Mit wenigen Ausnahmen finden die Veranstaltungen in Englischer Sprache statt.

More info / weitere Infos:
https://www.sowi.hu-berlin.de/de/lehrbereiche/stadtsoz/think_drink

ABSTRACT
More than 625,000 individuals are released from prison in the United States each year, and roughly half of these individuals will be back in prison within just three years. A likely contributor to the churning of the same individuals in and out of prison is the fact that many released prisoners return home to the same urban environment with the same criminal opportunities and criminal peers that proved so detrimental to their behavior prior to incarceration. This study uses Hurricane Katrina as a natural experiment for examining the question of whether residential relocation away from an old neighborhood can lead to desistance from crime. For many prisoners released soon after Katrina, they could not go back to their old neighborhoods as they normally would have done. Their neighborhoods were devastated by a once-a-generation storm that damaged the vast majority of housing units in New Orleans. Hurricane Katrina provided a rare opportunity to investigate what happens when individuals move not just a short distance, but to entirely different cities, counties, and social worlds. This study draws upon both quantitative and qualitative evidence to reveal where newly released prisoners resided in the wake of the Katrina, the effect of residential relocation on the likelihood of reincarceration through eight years post-release, and the mechanisms revealing why residential change is so important.