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Georg-Simmel-Zentrum für Metropolenforschung

Where AfD is (not) strong

Wann 18.11.2019 von 18:00 bis 20:00 (Europe/Berlin / UTC100) iCal
Wo Universitätsstraße 3b; 10117 Berlin; R002
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Title: Where AfD is (not) strong: urbanization, provinciality, anti-politics

Speaker: Prof. Dr. Bernd Belina, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt

(Abstract below / Kurzbeschreibung s. unten)

ENGLISH
The Think and Drink Series is presented by the Georg-Simmel-Center for Metropolitan Studies @ HU Berlin
-> on Mondays 6pm ct Room 002 (Ground Floor)
-> Universitätsstraße 3b / 10117 Berlin
-> Free & open to anyone interested in Urban Sociology, no prior registration needed
-> Talks and discussions take place in English language (with few exceptions)

DEUTSCH
Die Veranstaltungen der Think and Drink Reihe werden präsentiert vom Georg-Simmel-Zentrum für Metropolenforschung an der HU Berlin.
-> immer Montags 18 Uhr ct. in Raum 002 (Erdgeschoss)
-> Universitätsstraße 3b / 10117 Berlin
-> Kostenlos und offen für alle stadtsoziologisch Interessierten, keine vorherige Anmeldung nötig
-> Mit wenigen Ausnahmen finden die Veranstaltungen in Englischer Sprache statt.

More info / weitere Infos:
https://www.sowi.hu-berlin.de/de/lehrbereiche/stadtsoz/think_drink

ABSTRACT
The electoral success of the AfD is marked by three spatial patterns. It is stronger in east Germany than in west German, within east and west it is stronger in southern parts than in northern parts, and finally, it is stronger in municipalities with fewer inhabitants that in municipalities with more inhabitants. Making sense of the last pattern is at the center of this talk. Instead of referring back to the county-city-divide, it proposes to use the notions of urbanization (Lefebvre), provinciality (Adorno) and, finally, anti-politics, understood as a mode of making political claims that negates arguments, negotiations, and compromise and instead starts from absolute, non-negotiable positions. The talk argues that right-wing populism becomes a political project by, among other things, using anti-political subjectivations; that provinciality, understood as conscious or unconscious unreflectedness, is the opposite of the urban and therefore the breeding ground for anti-politics; and that the urban and provinciality both can be found in city and country alike, but that provinciality is more likely to materialize beyond metropolitain areas.